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frostmatey:

scarecrowinc93:

garymanderrr:

chapmen:

literally wtf the fuck

i love how the balloon one is just like ????

what kind of black magic is this family

what the what

runawaymarbles:

x-men + text posts (2/?) 

tattooliverpool:

Oh Deadpool!

tattooliverpool:

Oh Deadpool!

Less than 15% of venture-backed companies have a female founder, but Indiegogo says 47% of campaigns that reach their funding target are run by women [….] On Kickstarter, a similar platform to Indiegogo, roughly two-thirds of women-led tech firms reached their fundraising goals compared with 30 percent of tech companies with male founders.

Fortune Magazine this morning, helping Indiegogo —a tech company with a staff that is 45% female — refute the idea that there’s no female talent in the tech industry. (x)

I enjoy reading Fortune’s coverage of the gender/race gap in the tech industry because they rarely ask “where are the women?” and instead run stories saying “We know you don’t have any women on staff, but look, here the women are, they’re right here, and they’re actually doing better work than the men right now, so maybe you should think about employing a few.”

(via etharei)

fuckyeahbiguys:

"I’m sick of how bisexuality is erased in LGBT spaces. I get really nervous before any LGBT event, especially Pride. I feel incredibly sad and hopeless when gay and lesbian people call me insulting names. If gay and lesbian people don’t understand me – Continue reading Prejudice at Pride at Empathize This

giantpandaphotos:

Mei Xiang at the National Zoo in Washington D.C. on August 17, 2014.

© Dan Dan The Binary Man.

giantpandaphotos:

Mei Xiang at the National Zoo in Washington D.C. on August 17, 2014.

© Dan Dan The Binary Man.

An Invitation For Opinions! If it’s not too much trouble, of course.

The following is the opening to my new novel-in-progress. I’d like some thoughts on whether you’d turn the page after reading this much, and your thoughts on how you might improve this.

Read More

Writing Problems:  when you write something is going to happen that sounds awesome, but you can’t write the thing when the time comes.

(Seriously, what is moose?  It’s a game.  Not tag, not hide and go seek, not sardines.  Why would werewolves play a game called moose? Also moon food.  What food?  Donuts?  Moon pies?)

Most writers were the kids who easily, almost automatically, got A’s in English class. (There are exceptions, but they often also seem to be exceptions to the general writerly habit of putting off writing as long as possible.) At an early age, when grammar school teachers were struggling to inculcate the lesson that effort was the main key to success in school, these future scribblers gave the obvious lie to this assertion. Where others read haltingly, they were plowing two grades ahead in the reading workbooks. These are the kids who turned in a completed YA novel for their fifth-grade project. It isn’t that they never failed, but at a very early age, they didn’t have to fail much; their natural talents kept them at the head of the class.

This teaches a very bad, very false lesson: that success in work mostly depends on natural talent. Unfortunately, when you are a professional writer, you are competing with all the other kids who were at the top of their English classes. Your stuff may not—indeed, probably won’t—be the best anymore.

If you’ve spent most of your life cruising ahead on natural ability, doing what came easily and quickly, every word you write becomes a test of just how much ability you have, every article a referendum on how good a writer you are. As long as you have not written that article, that speech, that novel, it could still be good. Before you take to the keys, you are Proust and Oscar Wilde and George Orwell all rolled up into one delicious package. By the time you’re finished, you’re more like one of those 1940’s pulp hacks who strung hundred-page paragraphs together with semicolons because it was too much effort to figure out where the sentence should end.

Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators - Megan McArdle - The Atlantic

The Why Writing Is So Hard field of psychology is very interesting to me.

(via amyelizabeth)

gpoy. fuck “natural talent” in its eyeball. 

(via ilikelookingatnakedmen)

I had natural talent. And I am the worst procrastinator. Fortunately, there are Deadlines.

(via ellenkushner)

I think I’d read this before, but this part just grabbed me:

“The kids who race ahead in the readers without much supervision get praised for being smart,” says Dweck. “What are they learning? They’re learning that being smart is not about overcoming tough challenges. It’s about finding work easy. When they get to college or graduate school and it starts being hard, they don’t necessarily know how to deal with that.”

That was me, through and through, and I’m not even a millenial.

(via roane72)

“The kids who race ahead in the readers without much supervision get praised for being smart,” says Dweck. “What are they learning? They’re learning that being smart is not about overcoming tough challenges. It’s about finding work easy.”

::sighs in recognition::

Talent is not enough. You have to put in the work, too.

(via gothiccharmschool)

ALL OF THIS TRUE, AND NOT JUST APPLICABLE TO WRITING FOR A LIVING. Though of course, I do write for a living, if not fiction. Well, not officially.

(via monanotlisa)

killbenedictcumberbatch:

drugdoer:

A hero’s journey

this gif is like 20 seconds but it was like watching an entire movie

killbenedictcumberbatch:

drugdoer:

A hero’s journey

this gif is like 20 seconds but it was like watching an entire movie

nhaneh:

bored-no-more:

Ultimate proof that cats are smart !!! more smart cats«

Cat intelligence is actually a pretty interesting topic in that the majority of studies on the subject basically have to end in the conclusion "we just don’t know" because cats are among the most uncooperative research subjects of all time. We know a great deal of cat sight, having used cats as the archetype for a vision-focused vertebrate/mammal, but we still know very little about what really goes on inside the cat mind.

I am not Mike Brown. I am white. I am middle class. I am female. I am small. I am not considered a threat. When police see me they see someone who looks like them. They see their mothers, their daughters, their sisters, themselves. I am not at risk of being shot by police for existing while black. I am not at risk of being shot while unarmed. I am not at risk of being shot while armed with nothing more than a BB gun. I am not at risk of being shot for reaching for my wallet. I am privileged.
But I am outraged. And if you aren’t outraged, then you aren’t paying attention. This is America in 2014. This is our reality. It’s so easy to get jaded and to ignore these atrocities, to act like this doesn’t affect us. It’s so easy to get apathetic. In the past it was the youth who protested. Where is the rage of the youth? Where is our rage?
Like I said, I am not Mike Brown. But I am outraged.